Course Offerings

 

Spring 2019 Course Offerings

AS 100-002 online: Introduction to Judaism

Professor Sheinfeld

What is Judaism?  Who are the Jews?  Judaism is a dynamic religious tradition that has developed many forms during a more than 3,000 year history that has spanned nearly the entire globe.  In an effort to understand the ways in which Jews have lived their lives, we will explore how Jewish self-identity, textual traditions, and religious practices combine to define Judaism from its inception until today.  This course will be divided into three main sections: 1) Historical Framework, 2) Beliefs and Practices and 30 Topics in Judaism and Jewish Studies.  In studying the traditions, we will examine the textual evidence, theological tracts, and more personal accounts of what it is to be Jewish and to practice Judaism.

 

HJS 102 - Elementary Modern Hebrew (cont'd)

Professor Frese

Continued introduction to the basic structures and vocabulary of Modern Hebrew. Students will develop skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and will gain broad exposure to modern Israeli culture. (Prerequisite: HJS 101, offered every fall semester).

MTWR     10-10:50    

 

HJS 110 - Introduction to the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible

Professor Frese

An introduction to the best-selling and most influential book ever written - a text foundational to both Judaism and Christianity. In this course we will survey the contents of the biblical text, paying close attention to its narrative artistry, its historicity, and its relationship to the ancient Near Eastern culture in which it was written.

TR     12:30-1:45   

 

HON 151: Jerusalem Through the Ages

Professor Welch

As a prominent site in the religious and cultural histories of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, Jerusalem is uniquely situated as one of the world’s most sacred cities. For more than 3,000 years, this city has been a focal point of religious and political activity. Through the critical reading of historical and religious texts, and archaeological data, this course will explore the historical development of Jerusalem as a sacred place in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam and evaluate the competing narratives surrounding its identity. For example, how does an insignificant village on a tiny hill become the focal point of modern religious and political tension? Jerusalem has been inhabited for more than 6,000 years and today is recognized as one of the most sacred cities in the world. How did this ancient city grow to have such significance? In this course, we’ll explore the historical development of Jerusalem from its founding until the 21st century. By analyzing historical and religious texts, archaeological remains, and the art and architecture of Jerusalem we’ll explore what we can know about Jerusalem’s history and how this knowledge can inform our understanding of the religious and political conflicts seen today.

 
During the course of the semester, students in Jerusalem Through the Ages will consider the following questions: • How and when did Jerusalem become a political and religious epicenter for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam? • What kind of evidence is there for reconstructing Jerusalem’s history and how do we evaluate the different kinds of evidence? • Why does there always seem to be conflict in Jerusalem and where does it come from? Is there a solution?

MWF 1:00-1:50 Lewis Hall U135

 

HJS 202 - Intermediate Modern Hebrew (cont'd)

Professor Frese

This course will further develop students’ listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Modern Hebrew. Emphasized aspects will include new categories of present and past tense verbs, new vocabulary, verbal/reading comprehension, unstructured expression in Hebrew, and exposure to modern Israeli culture. (Prerequisite: HJS 201, offered every fall semester)

TR     2-3:15    PM

 

HIS 323: The Holocaust

Professor Voogt

This course will attempt to help students understand the events that resulted in the virtual destruction of Europe's Jews during the Second World War.  Through this case study, we will try to understand some of the features of the phenomenon of genocide.  Readings, discussion, and audio-visual materials will cover topics including the history of anti-semitism, the ways in which Nazi policy against the Jews was implemented, the various Jewish reactions to Nazi policy, including Jewish resistance, and the response of non-Jews and of other governments to the Holocaust.
 
TR     9:30-10:45 AM    

 

HJS 324/HIS 353-002:

Professor Popkin

T/R 2:00-3:15 pm

This class examines major developments in Jewish history, culture, and thought from the time of the expulsion of the Jews from Spain in 1492 to the present day. We will consider how Jewish diaspora communities have interacted with their surroundings, and how they have responded to the changing conditions of the modern world, including such key issues as the Enlightenment, the rise of modern nation-states, assimilation, and resurgent anti-Semitism. We will also consider changes in the practice of Judaism in this period, including the rise of Reform Judaism, neo-Orthodoxy, and Hasidism. The class concludes with the Holocaust, the creation of the state of Israel, and contemporary concerns.

 

WRD 401-003: Composing Oral History: Jewish Kentucky 

Professor Fernheimer

TR     2:00-3:15 pm   

In this course students will learn about the rhetorical constraints and affordances of oral history as a mode of historical preservation and cultural production. Students will learn  about oral history methods and put what they learn into practice by working first-hand with the Jewish Heritage Fund for Excellence Jewish Kentucky Oral History Collection housed here at the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History.  Specifically, students will help make extant interviews accessible by creating searchable indexes using the Nunn Center's open source platform OHMS (the oral history metadata synchronizer), they will work with their peers to develop an interview protocol and conduct an original oral history interview of a local Jewish community member, and they will create digital stories (using Omekka or video documentary) to further the reach of the project. 

 

WRD 420: Rhetorical Traditions: Arguing with God?: Introduction to Jewish Rhetorics

Professor Fernheimer

T/R 11:00-12:15

In this course we will investigate the history and theory of rhetoric  in both historical and contemporary Jewish contexts—we will ask such questions as: What constitutes the canons of Jewish rhetoric? How does one argue with God? How do Jewish rhetorics intersect with or complicate  Greco-Roman and/or other rhetorical traditions? What does it mean to think about Jewish Rhetorics as part of a larger discourse on cultural rhetorics?  We will also learn about contemporary debates in rhetorical historiography as well as contrastive and comparative approaches to studies in rhetorical history and theory.  No prior knowledge of Judaism or Jewish rhetoric required.


HJS 425-001/MCL597-001 Topics in Judaic Studies: Women and Jewish Literature

Professor Jelen

T/Th 11:00-12:15

Women in traditional Jewish society were not granted access to the texts at the heart of Jewish culture – the Torah, the Talmud, and other legal codes and treatises. While great strides have been made in the last century to try to educate Jewish women, their relationship with the texts that have traditionally been reserved for men continues to be extremely fraught. In this class we explore the relationship between Jewish women and Jewish textuality – as readers, as writers, and as subjects of literary expression. We will try to understand the complex interconnectedness of being a reader and being a writer, as well as of being a subject and an object of the literary gaze.

 

MCL 495

Professor Jelen

T/Th 9:30-10:45

In this course we will focus upon Holocaust testimony from a variety of different theoretical perspectives in an attempt to construct a methodology for identifying, reading, and interpreting testimony in oral, visual, textual and fictional media. Through class presentations and final projects on testimony in a variety of media, students will have the opportunity to test the resilience and the limits of testimonial discourse. 

*Open only to MCL majors; however, with Director's approval this will count toward the JS minor.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fall 2018 Course Offerings

WRD 210: Craft Writing: Bourbon Writing

Whitehall Classroom Building 209

T/R 11:00 - 12:15

This course introduces students to Kentucky's iconic Bourbon history and heritage and the many minorities--Jews, African Americans, Japanese, Irish, and other ethnic immigrants who participated in its development.  Students will gain familiarity and practice in the genres of Bourbon writing. Additionally, students will be introduced to primary sources including the Kentucky Bourbon Tales and the Jewish Heritage Fund for Excellence Jewish Kentucky Bourbon oral history collections as well as the Schenley materials in UK's Special Collections and Resources. 

HJS 101 - Elementary Hebrew

Introduction to the basic structures and vocabulary of Modern Hebrew. The curriculum includes developing students' skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as broad exposure to modern Israeli culture.

MTWTh 10-10:50am

HJS 201 - Intermediate Hebrew

This course will further develop students’ listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Modern Hebrew. Emphasized aspects will include new categories of present and past tense verbs, new vocabulary, verbal/reading comprehension, unstructured expression in Hebrew, and exposure to modern Israeli culture.

T/Th 2-3:15

HJS 324/HIS 352 - Jewish Thought and Culture I: From Ancient Israel through the Middle Ages

In this course we will trace the major intellectual and cultural themes in the Israelite/Jewish tradition through ca. 2,500 years of history. We will begin with the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and the earliest historic Ancient Israel, and continue through the Rabbinic Judaism of late antiquity and into the Middle Ages. 

T/Th 12:30-1:45

MCL 190: Elementary Yiddish

This course introduces Yiddish as a living language.  You will gain some
proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.  There are no
formal prerequisites, but knowledge of Hebrew, Polish, Russian, and
German is certainly helpful, because Yiddish is a West Germanic
language, written with a modified Hebrew alphabet (although we will
start with Romanized writing) and has significant vocabulary borrowed
from Slavic languages.

MWF 10:00-10:50 AM  place TBD

 

 

Spring 2018 Course Offerings

HJS 102 - Elementary Modern Hebrew (cont'd)

Continued introduction to the basic structures and vocabulary of Modern Hebrew. Students will develop skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and will gain broad exposure to modern Israeli culture. (Prerequisite: HJS 101, offered every fall semester).

MTWR     10-10:50     PAHA 229

 

HJS 110 - Introduction to the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible

An introduction to the best-selling and most influential book ever written - a text foundational to both Judaism and Christianity. In this course we will survey the contents of the biblical text, paying close attention to its narrative artistry, its historicity, and its relationship to the ancient Near Eastern culture in which it was written.

TR     2-3:15     Fine Arts Bldg.  208

 

HJS 202 - Intermediate Modern Hebrew (cont'd)

This course will further develop students’ listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Modern Hebrew. Emphasized aspects will include new categories of present and past tense verbs, new vocabulary, verbal/reading comprehension, unstructured expression in Hebrew, and exposure to modern Israeli culture. (Prerequisite: HJS 201, offered every fall semester)

TR     2-3:15     Fine Arts Bldg.  208

 

HIS 323: The Holocaust. 

This course will attempt to help students understand the events that resulted in the virtual destruction of Europe's Jews during the Second World War.  Through this case study, we will try to understand some of the features of the phenomenon of genocide.  Readings, discussion, and audio-visual materials will cover topics including the history of anti-semitism, the ways in which Nazi policy against the Jews was implemented, the various Jewish reactions to Nazi policy, including Jewish resistance, and the response of non-Jews and of other governments to the Holocaust.
 
TR     2:00-3:15 PM     WHCB 114

 

WRD 401-004: Composing Oral History

Professor: Dr. Fernheimer

TR     11:00-12:15     WHCB Rm. 205

In this course students will learn about the rhetorical constraints and affordances of oral history as a mode of historical preservation and cultural production. Students will learn  about oral history methods and put what they learn into practice by working first-hand with the Jewish Heritage Fund for Excellence Jewish Kentucky Oral History Collection housed here at the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History.  Specifically, students will help make extant interviews accessible by creating searchable indexes using the Nunn Center's open source platform OHMS (the oral history metadata synchronizer), they will work with their peers to develop an interview protocol and conduct an original oral history interview of a local Jewish community member, and they will create digital stories (using Omekka or video documentary) to further the reach of the project. 

*Note the Kentucky Jewish History Symposium will take place on UK's campus April 12-13, 2018, and select students who excel in the course will have the opportunity to present their work at this scholarly conference. 

Did you know that Kentucky Bourbon, one of the Commonwealth’s signature industries has a long heritage of Jewish distillers, wholesalers, and whiskey men/women? Did you know that Louisville’s Jewish Hospital emerged during a time when it was difficult for Jewish doctors to find jobs and Jewish patients to be treated at regular hospitals? Did you know that Lexington has two synagogues with more than 100 years of history and that at one point, most of Lexington’s downtown merchants included Jewish-owned shops? Did you know that the University of Kentucky was home to a Jewish Fraternity (Zeta Beta Tau) and Jewish sorority (Phi Sigma Sigma) in the early part of the 20th century and that its Jewish Student organization, Hillel, has been active on campus for more than 80 years? Students in this class will learn about these and other aspects of Kentucky’s Jewish heritage. They will explore the multi-ethnic fabric of Lexington’s, past, present, and future by working directly with oral histories in University of Kentucky’s Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History and primary materials in UK’s Special Collections libraries. Students will index and curate materials in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History using OHMS—the Oral History Metadata Synchronizer, conduct oral history interviews with local Jewish community members, present their research to their peers, and construct  short video documentary or an Omekka exhibit to share these valuable cultural resources with the public. 

HIS 534: Russia in the Nineteenth Century

*Jewish Students credit available, dependent on Director approval

This course examines the social, political, and cultural history of 19th Century Russia in depth, focusing on the social conditions of serfdom and its abolition, the causes of social tension in late Imperial Russia, and the long term causes of the Russian Revolution of 1917.

TR 3:30-4:45     WHCB 303

 

 

 

 

 

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